Entries by admin

Plainsawn Wood

Plain sawing, also commonly called flat sawn, is the most common lumber you will find. This is the most inexpensive way to manufacture logs into lumber. Plain sawn lumber is the most common type of cut. The annular rings are generally 30 degrees or less to the face of the board; this is often referred […]

Riftsawn Wood

Rift sawing (radially sawing) is a technique of cutting boards from logs radially so the annual rings are nearly 90° to the faces. When rift-sawn, each piece is cut along a radius of the original log, so that the saw cuts at right angles to the tree’s growth rings. Rift-sawing produces lumber of the greatest […]

Quartersawn Wood

Quarter sawing is a type of cut in the rip-sawing of logs into lumber. Quarter sawn is defined as boards made by sawing a log into quarters and then sawing out boards in parallel cuts with varying angles of the sides to the growth rings up to 30°, 45° or 60° from the annual rings. […]

Site-finished Floor

With a site-finished floor, we will install the bare wood in your home, sand it, seal or stain it, and finish it with water-based finish. Since your home is not a “clean room” environment, things such as dust, hair, or dirt can get in your finish before it is dry. Although we do everything we […]

Prefinished Floor

With pre-finished flooring, the boards have been stained and finished in a “clean-room” environment, where there are no environmental variables, such as household dust or humidity fluctuations. The surface will look uniform—like that of furniture. In most cases, there will be a micro-beveled edge between each board.

Reclaimed Wood Floor

If you’re looking for more character in your wood floor, reclaimed wood is something you might want to consider. There will be more worm holes, saw marks, nail holes, etc. in the wood, because it may have come from an old barn, old warehouse, or even an old wood bridge. Sometimes the wood could be […]

American Black Walnut

Appearance: Heartwood ranges from a deep, rich dark brown to a purplish black. Sapwood is nearly white to tan. Difference between heartwood and sapwood color is great. Grain: Mostly straight and open, but some boards have burled or curly grain. Hardness: Janka: 1010; (22% softer than Northern red oak). Finish: Takes most finish well. Staining […]

American Cherry

Appearance: This species has a very fine, delicate, frequently wavy grain pattern.  The distinctive gum veins and pockets are unique to American Cherry. Grain: Fine, undulating lines with a uniform texture. Hardness: Janka: 950; 26% softer than Northern red oak. Finish: Takes most finish well. Staining is not typical.

Ash

Appearance: Ash has an appearance of light and medium warm tones; sapwood is creamy white. A predominate characteristic of Ash is that of a yellow hue. One may think of America’s pastime in that baseball bats are commonly made of Ash. Grain: Moderately open straight grain with occasional wavy figuring. Hardness: Janka: 1320; 2% harder […]

Birch

Appearance:  Birch is typically culled out into two categories with the following characteristics: Yellow Birch (which consists mainly of the sapwood) has a creamy pale yellow nature while the Red Birch (which consists mostly of heartwood) has a light reddish brown tinge. “Curly” birch has a distinct characteristic where the wood looks wavy. This is […]